Nora Quoirin: Does the McCann case provide a case study on what to do when a child disappears, or what not to do?

The McCann Rule-of-Thumb is raise money, exert pressure, and remote control an investigation from abroad by having your superior country’s resources criticize every aspect of the investigation.

Make sure the case stays in the media because that will focus local cops on searching and investigation. [No, it will focus them on reading the tabloids criticizing what they’re doing].

The McCanns Rule-of-Thumb also suggests waiting as long as possible to give statements to the police, and telling the police to follow the leads you give them. In short, control the narrative. Also, make sure siblings don’t talk to the investigators, as this might actually get it on the right track.

The McCann-Rule-of-Thumb requires setting up PR spokesmen, and not dealing with the police but communicating instead to the public, especially through spokesmen, book deals, documentaries etc. All the profits from this naturally go to the search for the missing child, until it turns out it’s mostly used to pay for PR, legal fees and occasionally, an expensive mortgage.

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4 thoughts on “Nora Quoirin: Does the McCann case provide a case study on what to do when a child disappears, or what not to do?

  1. I think there are many of the blue print behaviours on show here. Red flags to me include: family announcing quite early on that the other siblings would not be questioned by police so as to protect them. While obviously there would be a need for sensitivity in questioning children surely the priority would be to see if they wittingly or unwittingly knew anything that would lead to their missing sister. It also tells you something about their relationship with the police – who the hell announces to a police investigation who they will and won’t be allowed to interview? People who have been given too much license to lead the narrative, that’s who.
    Having seen quite a few pictures of the house interior, I no longer accept the feasibility of someone coming in and abducting a terrified teenager the size of a small (slightly built admittedly ) adult. Whether she was sleeping up or downstairs. The upstairs is more of a mezzanine floor than an actual upstairs and I think she’d have been screaming blue murder. I just can’t believe that is a possibility.
    I believe something happened within the family that caused nora to go off angry or upset – I have set out a suggested proposal on the previous days blog (the one asking if there was a 7 hour delay in alerting the police). I don’t think it was noticed at first (possibly due to sleep medication) and that then further time was wasted by the family trying to find her themselves. It would be interesting to know if other residents of dusun heard or saw them searching in the period before police were called in.
    I think family are definitely not saying all they know – I think they know the circumstances in which she left and have either pushed the abduction theory to direct attention from what is probably a degree of poor judgement over safeguarding decisions (suitability of house, not monitoring family squabbles, possible use of sleep medicine leading to adults being unable to supervise or notice she was gone, delaying calling the police) , or they have actually convinced themselves that there was a stranger abduction following her going out after some sort of family squabble.

    I don’t get the fund raising – maybe in the early period if extended searching was needed but what can it fund now? It should be paid back or donated to a missing persons charity.

    Like

  2. Pingback: Irish Media contacts CrimeRocket + CrimeRocket’s Response | True Crime Rocket Science II

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